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Scottish Eleven
YOU MIGHT BE A HIGHLANDS JUNKIE IF…

If you named your West Highland terrier MacDuff and your cat Haggis…you might be a Highlands junkie.

If you wouldn’t think of missing the Highland Games…you might be a Highlands junkie.

If you check out the kilts at Comic-Con for your husband (and wish he'd wear them!)...you might be a Highlands Junkie.  ~ Colleen Poor

If you ever wanted to taste haggis…you might be a Highlands Junkie. ~ Joy Brown

If you can recite the names of Scottish kings…you might be a Highlands junkie.

If you ever wore a Kilt to Church…you might be a Highlands Junkie. ~ Joy Brown

If the sound of bagpipes is music to your ears…you might be a Highlands junkie.

If you’ve ever used the claymore hanging above your fireplace to carve your Thanksgiving turkey…you might be a Highlands Junkie.

If hearing a deep masculine burr turns your knees to jelly…you might be a Highlands junkie.

If every time you spot a hunky guy you imagine him in a kilt…you might be a Highlands junkie. ~ Lynn

If you’ve bought a house just because it’s fully decorated in plaid (drapes and other furnishings)…you might be a Highlands junkie. ~ Ann

If you dress your dog or cat in cute tartan outfits…you might be a Highlands junkie ~ Ann

If you had your car painted in a tartan…you might be a Highlands junkie ~ Ann

If you actually know what your Scotsman wears under his kilt, you might be a Highlands Junkie.
~ That Brunette

If you're at a hymnsing led by the music director and choir from your church, and see that one of the hymn tunes is based on an old Gaelic tune called "Bunessen", and you remember staying in a B&B in that very town on the Isle of Mull with great fondness…you might be a Highlands junkie. ~ Lynn

If the books on your keeper shelf all have “Highlander,” a bit of tartan or heather on the cover…you might be a Highlands junkie.

If Danny Boy always brings you to tears…you might be a Highlands junkie.

If you have kids named Angus, Agnes, Tavish or Hamish…you might be a Highlands junkie. 


And...


If your wedding cake topper looked like this

…you might be a Highlands junkie.



If your herd looks like this…you may be a Highlands junkie.
Have fun with these Celtic fonts from Dafont.com!
Celtic Garamond
Celtasmigoria
Celtic Knot
Celtic Eels
My heart's in the Highlands, my heart is not here,
My heart's in the Highlands, a-chasing the deer;
A-chasing the wild deer, and following the roe,
My heart's in the Highlands, wherever I go.

~ Robert Burns
As yet too hungry and too clumsy for tenderness, still he made love with a sort of unflagging joy that made me think that male virginity might be a highly underrated commodity.

~ Outlander by Diana Gabaldon

Sandy's Scot/Gael Glossary


A
Afore, before
Ain, own 
Argent, silver
Arbroath smokie, haddock smoked to a sooty copper color
At Meat, to eat, dine
Auld Reekie, Edinburgh
Aye, always 
Azure, blue

B
Bairn, child 
Bap, bread roll
Barm, yeast (still not obsolete)
Bawsins, cattle marked on the forehead
Ben (G)mountain
Bide/byde, stay
Bier, a lament, a moan 
Biggin, building
Bigly, beautiful 
Birdalane or burdalane, a term of   
    sorrowful endearment, applied to an only child,  
    especially a girl, to signify that she is without 
    household comrades or companions.
Black-mail, a tax levied by many Highland chieftains to 
    protect cattle traveling through their territories to   
    southern markets. Plaque (small Scottish coin) and not  
    black was the original term.
Blavers, blue cornflowers
Bluntie, a stupid fellow
Borde, table, as when referring to meals, food
Bodle, a small Scottish coin of less value than a bawbee, 
    the sixth of an English penny
Brae, hill
Brash, a sickness, eruption, rash
Breacan feile, (G) literal translation ”speckled cloth”, what we know as plaid
Breeks, nether garments of a man, trews, breeches
Bring home, to deliver a child
Bryttle, to cut up venison
Buckie, periwinkle
Burn, brook

C
Ca’ cannie!,(G)exclamation, Beware!
Caird, tinker
Cairn, heap of stones marking a particular spot/grave/path
Cannie, canny, careful
Cantie, a charm, a spell, a mischievous trick
Canteran, a term applied by Lowlanders to a Highland 
    marauder, thought to be lawless predators
Cauf, calf
Close, narrow passage between buildings
Coo, cow
Coof, a fool, blockhead
Coll, embrace
Cushat, a turtle dove, a wood pigeon
Cuttie stool, a short three legged stool

D
Darg, a job of work, also wark
Dautie, a darling, one who is fondled and affectionately 
    treated.
Dawds and blawds, a phrase that denotes the greatest 
    abundance
Deil’s-buckie or Deevil’s-buckie, an angry epithet applied 
    to any mischievous lad. Also thrawn and twisted buckie

E
Eke, to add to, an addition to a testament, a codicil to a will, that extra glass of whisky pressed onto a guest at the end of the night
 
F
Fashious, troublesome
Feileadh beag, (G) Garb of old(auld) Gaul, modern = full kilt
Fetishly, elegantly
Fey, fated, bewitched, unlucky, one who’s fate is known or 
    prophesized
Full fair, elegant, beautiful

G
“Garb of auld Gaul”, consists of a piece of woolen cloth, 
    two meters in width, six meters in length, carefully 
    gathered into pleats at the center, one end being worn    
    about the wearer’s back, over the shoulder, and secured   
    by a brooch at the shoulder and a stout leather belt at 
    the waist
Gilpie, a saucy young girl
Gridle or bander, a circular iron plate used for roasting 
    oat cakes over an open fire
Glack, a ravine
Glamour, enchantment, witchcraft, fascination
Gled, a kite, a hawk, a vulture
Gloaming, the twilight
Glunch, an angry frown
Gowk, a cuckoo, also a fool
Gowl, to bawl and howl
Gowpen, two handfuls
Grandgore, glengore, or glandgore, the venereal disease
Greet, cry, weep
Grue, a greyhound
Gurr, to snarl like an angry dog
Gutcher, grandfather

H
Havers, oats, Haver-meal, oatmeal, Can also mean nonsense.
Hawkie, pet name for a favorite cow or one who is a good   
    milker
Hetch, to offer, to promise as in “And Willie hetch to 
     marry me.” 
Hinnie, term of endearment among Highlanders
Hizzie, a huzzy lass
Hogmanay, (G) New Year’s Day celebration
Holm, meadow
Hoodock, hooded owl
Houghmagandie, (G) child bearing, often wrongly supposed to  
      mean illicit sex. It was more the result of    
      sex, illicit or otherwise.
Howdie or Howdie-wife, a mid-wife
Hurdies, the hips, rounded muscle bottom

I
Ingle, the fire. Ingle-side, the fireside or hearth. 
Inglin, fuel
Insidiously, seductively

J
Jimp, slender at the waist

K
Kain, tribute or tax
Kain-bairns, a boarder Scot superstition that infants were 
    seized in their cradles by warlocks and witches and 
    paid as a kain to their master the devil.
Keen, to weep loudly
Kelpie, a water-sprite
Keltie, a large glass with a round bottom that could not be set down unless drained.
Ken, know or understand
Kinnen, rabbits
Kirk, church

L
Lane, alone
Laverock, the lark
Limmer, a deprecating epithet for a woman, one who leaps   
    the bounds of propriety

M
Mauks, maggots
Mawmet, an idol 
Mearache, (G) an error
Meggy Monyfeet, a centipede
Merle, the blackbird
Messan, a cur, a lap-dog
Minnie, term of endearment for a mother

N
Nappie, strong drink

O
Or, gold
Outlers, the cattle left out at night for want of a barn
Outside of the Loof, the back side of the hand, as in “The  
    outside of my loof to ye” indicating a rejection of 
    friendship

P
Padda, or Paddock, a frog or toad, a paddock stool would be  
    our toad stool mushroom
Parritch or Porridge, boiled oats seasoned with milk and 
    salt often with butter or beer
Partan, crabs
Penny-fee, wages
Pickle, a small quantity, also beag
Pig, an earthen pitcher, vessel, or flower pot
Pit-dark, dark as the bottom of a pit
Pirrie-dog, a dog that follows his master’s heels
Piss-a-bed, a vulgar name for the despised dandelion or 
    taraxacum
Plack, an ancient Scottish coin valued at one twelfth an 
    English penny
Pockpud, an abbreviation of the contemptuous epithet pock-  
    pudding meaning the English.

R
Rispie, a bulrush, a badge worn on the bonnet by the clan   
    Mackay

S
Sark, the linen, woolen, silken or cotton garment worn next 
    to the skin by men and women.
Seabhag, (G) hawk
Slainte mhor! (G) Good health!
Smote, to strike
Snow up, to clean
Spake, spoke
Suggit, subject, servant

T
Taibhseam, (G) a ghost

U

V
Verra, very
Vert, green
Visage, face
Voweress, a widow who pledge herself to God without becoming a nun

W
Whisky, no “e”
Whistle binkie, a musician, harpist, fiddler, or piper Wully-wha-ing, insincere flattery
Withershins, to move or pass something against the course 
    of the sun, the wrong way around a table.
Wowf, particularly deranged. Wud, raging or stark raving 
    mad, where as daft is only slightly deranged.
Wynd, a narrow, winding street

Y
Yeld, barren
Yestreen, yesterday or last night
A
Afore, before
Ain, own 
Argent, silver
Arbroath smokie, haddock smoked to a sooty copper color
At Meat, to eat, dine
Auld Reekie, Edinburgh
Aye, always 
Azure, blue

B
Bairn, child 
Bap, bread roll
Barm, yeast (still not obsolete)
Bawsins, cattle marked on the forehead
Ben (G)mountain
Bide/byde, stay
Bier, a lament, a moan 
Biggin, building
Bigly, beautiful 
Birdalane or burdalane, a term of   
    sorrowful endearment, applied to an only child,  
    especially a girl, to signify that she is without 
    household comrades or companions.
Black-mail, a tax levied by many Highland chieftains to 
    protect cattle traveling through their territories to   
    southern markets. Plaque (small Scottish coin) and not  
    black was the original term.
Blavers, blue cornflowers
Bluntie, a stupid fellow
Borde, table, as when referring to meals, food
Bodle, a small Scottish coin of less value than a bawbee, 
    the sixth of an English penny
Brae, hill
Brash, a sickness, eruption, rash
Breacan feile, (G) literal translation ”speckled cloth”, what we know as plaid
Breeks, nether garments of a man, trews, breeches
Bring home, to deliver a child
Bryttle, to cut up venison
Buckie, periwinkle
Burn, brook

C
Ca’ cannie!,(G)exclamation, Beware!
Caird, tinker
Cairn, heap of stones marking a particular spot/grave/path
Cannie, canny, careful
Cantie, a charm, a spell, a mischievous trick
Canteran, a term applied by Lowlanders to a Highland 
    marauder, thought to be lawless predators
Cauf, calf
Close, narrow passage between buildings
Coo, cow
Coof, a fool, blockhead
Coll, embrace
Cushat, a turtle dove, a wood pigeon
Cuttie stool, a short three legged stool

D
Darg, a job of work, also wark
Dautie, a darling, one who is fondled and affectionately 
    treated.
Dawds and blawds, a phrase that denotes the greatest 
    abundance
Deil’s-buckie or Deevil’s-buckie, an angry epithet applied 
    to any mischievous lad. Also thrawn and twisted buckie

E
Eke, to add to, an addition to a testament, a codicil to a will, that extra glass of whisky pressed onto a guest at the end of the night
 
F
Fashious, troublesome
Feileadh beag, (G) Garb of old(auld) Gaul, modern = full kilt
Fetishly, elegantly
Fey, fated, bewitched, unlucky, one who’s fate is known or 
    prophesized
Full fair, elegant, beautiful

G
“Garb of auld Gaul”, consists of a piece of woolen cloth, 
    two meters in width, six meters in length, carefully 
    gathered into pleats at the center, one end being worn    
    about the wearer’s back, over the shoulder, and secured   
    by a brooch at the shoulder and a stout leather belt at 
    the waist
Gilpie, a saucy young girl
Gridle or bander, a circular iron plate used for roasting 
    oat cakes over an open fire
Glack, a ravine
Glamour, enchantment, witchcraft, fascination
Gled, a kite, a hawk, a vulture
Gloaming, the twilight
Glunch, an angry frown
Gowk, a cuckoo, also a fool
Gowl, to bawl and howl
Gowpen, two handfuls
Grandgore, glengore, or glandgore, the venereal disease
Greet, cry, weep
Grue, a greyhound
Gurr, to snarl like an angry dog
Gutcher, grandfather

H
Havers, oats, Haver-meal, oatmeal, Can also mean nonsense.
Hawkie, pet name for a favorite cow or one who is a good   
    milker
Hetch, to offer, to promise as in “And Willie hetch to 
     marry me.” 
Hinnie, term of endearment among Highlanders
Hizzie, a huzzy lass
Hogmanay, (G) New Year’s Day celebration
Holm, meadow
Hoodock, hooded owl
Houghmagandie, (G) child bearing, often wrongly supposed to  
      mean illicit sex. It was more the result of    
      sex, illicit or otherwise.
Howdie or Howdie-wife, a mid-wife
Hurdies, the hips, rounded muscle bottom

I
Ingle, the fire. Ingle-side, the fireside or hearth. 
Inglin, fuel
Insidiously, seductively

J
Jimp, slender at the waist

K
Kain, tribute or tax
Kain-bairns, a boarder Scot superstition that infants were 
    seized in their cradles by warlocks and witches and 
    paid as a kain to their master the devil.
Keen, to weep loudly
Kelpie, a water-sprite
Keltie, a large glass with a round bottom that could not be set down unless drained.
Ken, know or understand
Kinnen, rabbits
Kirk, church

L
Lane, alone
Laverock, the lark
Limmer, a deprecating epithet for a woman, one who leaps   
    the bounds of propriety

M
Mauks, maggots
Mawmet, an idol 
Mearache, (G) an error
Meggy Monyfeet, a centipede
Merle, the blackbird
Messan, a cur, a lap-dog
Minnie, term of endearment for a mother

N
Nappie, strong drink

O
Or, gold
Outlers, the cattle left out at night for want of a barn
Outside of the Loof, the back side of the hand, as in “The  
    outside of my loof to ye” indicating a rejection of 
    friendship

P
Padda, or Paddock, a frog or toad, a paddock stool would be  
    our toad stool mushroom
Parritch or Porridge, boiled oats seasoned with milk and 
    salt often with butter or beer
Partan, crabs
Penny-fee, wages
Pickle, a small quantity, also beag
Pig, an earthen pitcher, vessel, or flower pot
Pit-dark, dark as the bottom of a pit
Pirrie-dog, a dog that follows his master’s heels
Piss-a-bed, a vulgar name for the despised dandelion or 
    taraxacum
Plack, an ancient Scottish coin valued at one twelfth an 
    English penny
Pockpud, an abbreviation of the contemptuous epithet pock-  
    pudding meaning the English.

R
Rispie, a bulrush, a badge worn on the bonnet by the clan   
    Mackay

S
Sark, the linen, woolen, silken or cotton garment worn next 
    to the skin by men and women.
Seabhag, (G) hawk
Slainte mhor! (G) Good health!
Smote, to strike
Snow up, to clean
Spake, spoke
Suggit, subject, servant

T
Taibhseam, (G) a ghost

U

V
Verra, very
Vert, green
Visage, face
Voweress, a widow who pledge herself to God without becoming a nun

W
Whisky, no “e”
Whistle binkie, a musician, harpist, fiddler, or piper Wully-wha-ing, insincere flattery
Withershins, to move or pass something against the course 
    of the sun, the wrong way around a table.
Wowf, particularly deranged. Wud, raging or stark raving 
    mad, where as daft is only slightly deranged.
Wynd, a narrow, winding street

Y
Yeld, barren
Yestreen, yesterday or last night
A
Afore, before
Ain, own
Argent, silver
Arbroath smokie, haddock smoked to a sooty copper color
At Meat, to eat, dine
Auld Reekie, Edinburgh
Aye, always
Azure, blue

B
Bairn, child
Bap, bread roll
Barm, yeast (still not obsolete)
Bawsins, cattle marked on the forehead
Ben (G)mountain
Bide/byde, stay
Bier, a lament, a moan
Biggin, building
Bigly, beautiful
Birdalane or burdalane, a term of  
    sorrowful endearment, applied to an only child, 
    especially a girl, to signify that she is without
    household comrades or companions.
Black-mail, a tax levied by many Highland chieftains to
    protect cattle traveling through their territories to  
    southern markets. Plaque (small Scottish coin) and not 
    black was the original term.
Blavers, blue cornflowers
Bluntie, a stupid fellow
Borde, table, as when referring to meals, food
Bodle, a small Scottish coin of less value than a bawbee,
    the sixth of an English penny
Brae, hill
Brash, a sickness, eruption, rash
Breacan feile, (G) literal translation ”speckled cloth”, what we know as plaid
Breeks, nether garments of a man, trews, breeches
Bring home, to deliver a child
Bryttle, to cut up venison
Buckie, periwinkle
Burn, brook

C
Ca’ cannie!,(G)exclamation, Beware!
Caird, tinker
Cairn, heap of stones marking a particular spot/grave/path
Cannie, canny, careful
Cantie, a charm, a spell, a mischievous trick
Canteran, a term applied by Lowlanders to a Highland
    marauder, thought to be lawless predators
Cauf, calf
Close, narrow passage between buildings
Coo, cow
Coof, a fool, blockhead
Coll, embrace
Cushat, a turtle dove, a wood pigeon
Cuttie stool, a short three legged stool

D
Darg, a job of work, also wark
Dautie, a darling, one who is fondled and affectionately
    treated.
Dawds and blawds, a phrase that denotes the greatest
    abundance
Deil’s-buckie or Deevil’s-buckie, an angry epithet applied
    to any mischievous lad. Also thrawn and twisted buckie

E
Eke, to add to, an addition to a testament, a codicil to a will, that extra glass of whisky pressed onto a guest at the end of the night
 
F
Fashious, troublesome
Feileadh beag, (G) Garb of old(auld) Gaul, modern = full kilt
Fetishly, elegantly
Fey, fated, bewitched, unlucky, one who’s fate is known or
    prophesized
Full fair, elegant, beautiful

G
“Garb of auld Gaul”, consists of a piece of woolen cloth,
    two meters in width, six meters in length, carefully
    gathered into pleats at the center, one end being worn   
    about the wearer’s back, over the shoulder, and secured  
    by a brooch at the shoulder and a stout leather belt at
    the waist
Gilpie, a saucy young girl
Gridle or bander, a circular iron plate used for roasting
    oat cakes over an open fire
Glack, a ravine
Glamour, enchantment, witchcraft, fascination
Gled, a kite, a hawk, a vulture
Gloaming, the twilight
Glunch, an angry frown
Gowk, a cuckoo, also a fool
Gowl, to bawl and howl
Gowpen, two handfuls
Grandgore, glengore, or glandgore, the venereal disease
Greet, cry, weep
Grue, a greyhound
Gurr, to snarl like an angry dog
Gutcher, grandfather

H
Havers, oats, Haver-meal, oatmeal, Can also mean nonsense.
Hawkie, pet name for a favorite cow or one who is a good  
    milker
Hetch, to offer, to promise as in “And Willie hetch to
     marry me.”
Hinnie, term of endearment among Highlanders
Hizzie, a huzzy lass
Hogmanay, (G) New Year’s Day celebration
Holm, meadow
Hoodock, hooded owl
Houghmagandie, (G) child bearing, often wrongly supposed to 
      mean illicit sex. It was more the result of   
      sex, illicit or otherwise.
Howdie or Howdie-wife, a mid-wife
Hurdies, the hips, rounded muscle bottom

I
Ingle, the fire. Ingle-side, the fireside or hearth.
Inglin, fuel
Insidiously, seductively

J
Jimp, slender at the waist

K
Kain, tribute or tax
Kain-bairns, a boarder Scot superstition that infants were
    seized in their cradles by warlocks and witches and
    paid as a kain to their master the devil.
Keen, to weep loudly
Kelpie, a water-sprite
Keltie, a large glass with a round bottom that could not be set down unless drained.
Ken, know or understand
Kinnen, rabbits
Kirk, church

L
Lane, alone
Laverock, the lark
Limmer, a deprecating epithet for a woman, one who leaps  
    the bounds of propriety

M
Mauks, maggots
Mawmet, an idol
Mearache, (G) an error
Meggy Monyfeet, a centipede
Merle, the blackbird
Messan, a cur, a lap-dog
Minnie, term of endearment for a mother

N
Nappie, strong drink

O
Or, gold
Outlers, the cattle left out at night for want of a barn
Outside of the Loof, the back side of the hand, as in “The 
    outside of my loof to ye” indicating a rejection of
    friendship

P
Padda, or Paddock, a frog or toad, a paddock stool would be 
    our toad stool mushroom
Parritch or Porridge, boiled oats seasoned with milk and
    salt often with butter or beer
Partan, crabs
Penny-fee, wages
Pickle, a small quantity, also beag
Pig, an earthen pitcher, vessel, or flower pot
Pit-dark, dark as the bottom of a pit
Pirrie-dog, a dog that follows his master’s heels
Piss-a-bed, a vulgar name for the despised dandelion or
    taraxacum
Plack, an ancient Scottish coin valued at one twelfth an
    English penny
Pockpud, an abbreviation of the contemptuous epithet pock- 
    pudding meaning the English.

R
Rispie, a bulrush, a badge worn on the bonnet by the clan  
    Mackay

S
Sark, the linen, woolen, silken or cotton garment worn next
    to the skin by men and women.
Seabhag, (G) hawk
Slainte mhor! (G) Good health!
Smote, to strike
Snow up, to clean
Spake, spoke
Suggit, subject, servant

T
Taibhseam, (G) a ghost

U

V
Verra, very
Vert, green
Visage, face
Voweress, a widow who pledge herself to God without becoming a nun

W
Whisky, no “e”
Whistle binkie, a musician, harpist, fiddler, or piper Wully-wha-ing, insincere flattery
Withershins, to move or pass something against the course
    of the sun, the wrong way around a table.
Wowf, particularly deranged. Wud, raging or stark raving
    mad, where as daft is only slightly deranged.
Wynd, a narrow, winding street

Y
Yeld, barren
Yestreen, yesterday or last night